Episodes

  • S3 Episode 6: Life After Loss for Orphans in Africa The majority of the world’s population lives in low-income countries with extremely limited access to mental health care. For example, Africa has just 1.4 mental health professionals for every 100,000 people. For more than a decade, a multinational team of researchers has been exploring ways to help 50 million orphans in Africa who are grieving the ...
  • S3 Episode 5: Childbirth, Babies & Bonuses More than 800 women die in childbirth every day in the developing world – often because doctors know what to do, they just don’t do it. (There’s even a name for this: the know-do gap.) “We know for a fact doctors don’t do as much as they know – the know-do gap in healthcare is a ...
  • S3 Episode 4: How Sputnik Sent Women to College Today, women outnumber men on college campuses, but that wasn’t always the case. Before the 1960s, colleges routinely used gender quotas to suppress the number of women on campus. Some colleges excluded women entirely. There’s a curious backstory to how more women ended up in college, and it starts with the Soviet’s launch of the ...
  • S3 Episode 3 How Do Criminals Get Their Guns? Duke professor Philip J. Cook has been tracking the underground gun market in America for the last 15 years. For one project, his team went to one of the largest jails in the country and asked the inmates one simple question: where do you get your guns? They talked to 99 inmates which is remarkable, Cook ...
  • S3 Episode 2: Robots, WikiLeaks & The Fight Against Human Trafficking There’s evidence that diplomacy and public shaming are helping shine a light on a problem that depends on secrecy to survive: human trafficking. Each year, the U.S. State Department releases the Trafficking in Persons (TIP) report. The report ranks how well or how poorly countries are tackling human trafficking. Judith Kelley, Dean of the Sanford School of ...
  • S3 Episode 1: Slum Detectives Today, for our Season 3 premiere, we begin a three-part series, New Ideas for Policy in the Developing World. In this episode, high-tech meets high-need. How researchers are using Google Earth to find the undocumented slums of India. Duke Professor Anirudh Krishna has been studying slums in India for the past several years. When he first ...
  • S2 Episode 7: Secret Life of Muslims Ahmed Ahmed is an American-Muslim comedian who was typecast as a terrorist. Khalid Latif is a Muslim chaplain for the New York Police Department who was saluted in uniform, but harassed as a civilian. Mona Haydar and Sebastian Robins fought Islamophobia with doughnuts and conversation. There are as many different stories about being Muslim in the ...
  • S2 Episode 6: Flimflams, Scams and Ripoffs John Rusnak was a currency trader in Baltimore when he was convicted of one of the largest bank frauds in American history. He made some poor bets, and rather than telling his boss or others at the bank, he tried to cover the losses up. When he was finally discovered, the bank had lost close ...
  • S2 Episode 5: Bootstraps and Silver Spoons Most of us prize stories of people who start with nothing in life, and then become rich. Americans even have a saying for it: pulling yourself up by your bootstraps.  However, new economic research is revealing how wealth is actually built in the US and how difficult it is for some people to gain wealth, ...
  • S2 Episode 4: 7 Concerns About Teens and Phones, Unwrapped Ninety percent of adolescents in the U.S. now either own or can access a mobile phone with the internet. Parents worry about how much time teens spend with their devices — and it is a lot. Teens look at screens an unprecedented eight hours a day and cell phones are a major part of that; ...
  • S2 Episode 3: Crazy Districts, Lopsided Elections In the 2012 election, Democratic candidates for the U.S. House of Representatives nationally got 1.5 million more votes than Republican candidates but the Republicans emerged with a 33-seat majority in the House. Why? Because of gerrymandering. That’s when politicians draw voting districts to favor one political party or another. The practice is nothing new; politicians were ...
  • S2 Episode 2: Who is White? Very often, we toss around the terms “black,” “Latina,” and “white” as if we all agree on what they mean. Yet a look at history shows that ideas about our nation’s racial categories – what they are and who fits into them – are always changing. And in particular, answers to the question “who’s white?” ...